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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
into industrial policy, but certainly to provide an environment which business can operate profitably with certainty, with predictability and with the flexibility it needs and then try to attract the industries of the future. that is, you know, it may sound like a pat set of prescriptions, but it's the best idea we have. i don't know, as i said, if we have the national will to implement it. and even if we did, it's a long, long, slow process. but i don't see the alternative. i don't think closing our borders is an alternative, i don't think mandating wages that are uncompetitive is a solution. i don't have a better idea. >> heidi, a better idea or do you want to endorse steve's -- >> where you started which was with the foreign direct investment and what we should be looking to do is try to attract further foreign direct investment. foreign-owned companies already provide about five million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to, your story aside, tend to be fairly high-paying jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. today tend to be more weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the
subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of saving the environment. for example, for the same -- it would take a row of 50 wind turbines from the appalachian trail to maine, that's 178 miles, to produce the same amount of electricity that four nuclear reactors would produce. the best way, mr. president, to produce cheap, clean energy in the united states is to let the marketplace do it, let the marketplace do it, not to subsidize jobs for technology that can stand on its own and produces only a small amount of unreliable electricity. so, mr. president, let's use this week to celebrate but let's celebrate the end of the temporary 21-year-old wind production tax credit and use the $12.1 billion saved to reduce the federal debt. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i have come to the floor to speak just briefly about a very exciting opportunity and occurrence that we celebrate and honor every november, and that is the opportunity to adopt chil
air strikes. and it has been a problem since this administration helped create the environment in north africa. and in the middle east, with those who want to see israel destroyed could take power. more violence has occurred. not less. more people's lives are in danger, not less. there's less freedom of worship, not more. the things that we believe in, freedom of worship of all people, or no worship if people choose not to worship, those kind of things should be kept. and yet, we are seeing this administration took over afghanistan, more americans die and about half the time under commander-in-chief obama has died in seven years than president bush. american military. over 70% of those killed in afghanistan have been under commander obama and about half the time. we have seen violence escalating against americans in afghanistan. we have seen the last christian church, public christian church pull out of afghanistan. this administration should be encouraging freedom of worship, encouraging the liberation of women, of children. and yet, for all its help, it has created environmen
and tie business environment and a state people are leaving in droves. i could be sarcastic and say what do you expect? the constitutional analysis is your backyard is private property so unless there is aggressive harm going on to someone against their will or harm emanating, hurting somebody else the police have no right even to consider what you are doing. secondly the constitution not only requires fairness the proportionality meaning the punishment must sued the crime and the essence of crime is harm. who is harmed by splashing water on the sidewalk? who is harmed when you wash your car on a saturday? who is armed when the dog release itself and the fertilizer in the garden. stuart: who is harmed by this or that? the plan that. judge napolitano: that is a tenuous argument at best and i know they will make and in fact we talked about this before barack obama was reelected when we speculated what he might do if he were stymied by the republicans controlling one house of congress. he still ontrols the e p a and they can write regulations like the characters in san diego and they can f
. devastating the environment there. tourism costing many people their jobs, as well. cnn's ed lavandera saw the devastation firsthand when he covered the story. ed, as, of course, we wait eric holder's arrival, i'll let you proceed and may have to interrupt you as soon as he is to enter the room. so, what kind of reaction is there from this $4 billion planned settlement? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of people in the gulf coast region trying to figure out what all of this means and the money will be parcelled out. >> all right. sorry about that, ed. you have to hold that thought there. here's u.s. attorney general eric holder. >> i'm honored to join with associate attorney general tony west, assistant attorney general for the criminal division of the justice department lanny brewer, director robert casami of the security and exchange division, john beretta, head of the de deepwater horizon and achieving justice for those whose lives and livelihoods were impacted by the largest environmental disaster in the history of the united states. and to hold accountable -- hold accountable those wh
. what is different about this environment is that the bush tax rate will expire. we will revert to the rates under clinton for everyone unless president obama signed an extension. after this campaign, that would be pretty shocking. he ran explicitly but as a candidate to say that he will raise taxes on the top. unless he suddenly decides that, i didn't mean it, it does not really matter all that much what house speaker thinks. the tax cut will expire unless obama is willing to extend it. that changes the whole dynamic. virtually all of the republicans have decided the broker norquist pledged not to raise tax rates. if the tax cuts expire at the end of the year and then in january you extended for 97% of americans, the new never voted to raise tax rates. your only cutting taxes. it is possible for something like that -- when the speaker said that yesterday, it was not really reflecting the world that he now lives in. unless the president is willing to extend the tax cuts, they will not be extended. >> i have a question for you. to what extent will there be a major -- and the repu
that i had to survive in this environment. it was stopped the draft, stop the war, it was free speech, it was organization by unions and teaching assistants. all of the various studies and and out of that came with the women's movement. the media was so important to tell america how about the changes that were taking place. it was absolutely exhilarating. i never doubted that i was not doing what i should have been doing. the trip to africa was a new level of a troublesome for me >> every day thousands of people in a new-level of journalism for me. >> to be the only american journalist in that city to to the aftermath. >> the place where the bomb went off. >> is so important to seek thousands of people injured that people were still needing things and hospitals and we had the opportunity to tell the world about it. i could go on the road and tow cou the marbles about living in is geography. that show a lot of caring. it is so many things that i've watched happened. that i thought, wow! you say to yourself you are lucky to be here. >> for 49 years she has been married ... to photojourn
should be positioning your portfolio in this environment of uncertainty. he manages more than $14 billion for westfield capital. and will, i know you've got interesting thoughts about what's working right now and what people should be doing. which is great, we hear from a lot of people who freeze up at this point, keep things in cash. but you're looking specifically at stocks that might benefit from things like an improvement in the housing industry, which is something we heard yesterday from home depot. >> yeah, exactly. i think the one big difference with the debt ceiling negotiation, for example, the republicans had an incentive to make the current administration look bad because they're trying to win an election, right? well, now with the election over, i think there's an incentive for them not to obstruct. and so i do think something will get done. it'll most likely be a minor deal to buy some time and maybe we get a major deal in 2013. but at the end of the day, i think there'll be some fiscal drag in the first half of '13. rather than sitting cash where you get zero, what can you d
kids in an environment where not everybody, of course, but some significant chunk of the population has that racial issue. >> it's regrettable what happened down the road at ole miss. how many years does something regrettable have to be happening at ole miss. >> and it wasn't just a handful of students. 400 students were gathered, saying and doing these horrible things because of a biracial president was re-elected. that's very symbolic, and we should probably focus on race issues in this country. a lot of times we brush it under the rug and precedent that it doesn't exist. dr. laura, she used the "n" world multiple times in a broadcast while talking to one of her black listeners. she said, i can use it as many times i want. why do you argue about racism. we elected a black president. what resulted because of us having elected a black president. let's stop pretending that it doesn't exist. >> cenk: the irony you always talk about race. we're not the one who went down and burned the banner. we were not doing the racial slurs. we're the messenger. >> these are people who are being margina
effective agricultural environment around fez within, say, 15 or 20 miles radius. but you also had very effective forms of nonhuman transport -- donkeys, camels, horses, mules -- that could bring in all of the kinds of supplies that the city needed. now, that's one reason why you had such high population densities. one of the effects of really high population densities, of course, is to create very dense urban markets, lots of consumers concentrated in small spaces. and this is one of the reasons why fez has such a high degree of urban specialization. keach: as in ancient ostia, almost everyone in fez is a full-time specialist. in the tanning industry alone, there are some 20 specialized activities required to process skins into leather. there are washers and hair removers, buyers and sellers, and transport specialists. there are even specialties within a specialty. there are people who handle the donkeys that bring skins into the market, while others handle the donkeys taking skins out. this is a hair removing factory. it is run by mr. abdelrrahman ovadghiri. interpreter: we get up ear
to the environment than in fact was really occurring. acknowledging those lies, b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to felony obstruction of congress. make no mistake. while the company is guilty, individuals committed these crimes. and we have also unsealed today a 23 count indictment charging b.p.'s two highest ranking supervisors aboard the deep water horizon with manslaughter and violation of the clean water act. the indictment charges the two b.p. well site leaders with negligent and gross negligence on 2010. the red flags indicating that the well was not secure both men failed to take appropriate action to prevent the blow out. a separate indictment was also unsealed today charging a former senior b.p. expect sive with obstruction of a investigation and making false statements to law enforcement officials. the indictment alleges that he on behalf of b.p. intentionally under estimated the amount of oil flowing from the well. he allegedly cherry picked pages from documents, with held other documents al together and lied to congress and others to make this spill appear less catastrophic than it
to focus on these policies and create a pro-growth environment so that these businesses will have confidence in washington again and they will invest in their organizations and hire people. we are never going to create a pro-growth environment when they are doing things on twelvemonth plans or 18 months. it is not acceptable. look at what just happened in benghazi. we have to protect ourselves. we were attacked here on 9/11 on our own soil. host: when was there ever a period in our history where what was going on in washington guaranteed someone going into business that their business is going to be a success? and the success was not based on the performance of the business or the ability of the person who had the business to sell the product or service that he was putting out? guest: when in history has that happened? host: you are saying that people who are either in business of trying to go in business are not doing that because they are afraid what is happening here in washington. what i am is saying is, go ahead and take that chance. put your business together and see if the
for her to go to a less stressful environment so i think my parents ultimately made the decision that they could do something for me and my brother that would give us an experience culturally. threw us right into the fire with other native mexicans and if you want to go out and play you have to learn how it speak spanish with the other kids. >> reporter: and the learning curve didn't stop there. the game in mexico is different on their dirt fields. >> greater level of machismo and just -- so i think as kids, there's a whole lot of things they do from a football perspective that people might question i guess here in the states. >> might even be illegal. >> reporter: an experience that's brought a tougher brand of football to the farm. >> kids talk about one day we'll play football together, we'll play in college. to see that dream become reality is incredible. >> mom's been to a couple of games. stanford faces a team that has won 13 straight in oregon. leading team in the country. tough to stop. >> time to pluck those ducks. >> you got! >> something like that. >> if they do, they
. >> ( translated ): in the new environment, our party faces many severe challenges and there are many pressing problems within the party that need to be resolved. the problems among the party members and card res of corruption taking bribes, being out of touch with the people, undue emphasis on formalities and bureaucracy must be addressed with great effort:. >> ( translated ): -- >> reporter: we know only a little about xi. he's the son of a communist party hero. his daughter is at harvard and his wife is a famous singer. she holds a rank in the people's liberation army equivalent to major general but has disappeared from view since her husband was picked for the top. the other five on stage today are a conservative lot, reformers lost out in this reshuffle. this man studied economics in north korea. the man on the right has been in charge of propaganda and censorship. yesterday the politburo voted to include in their constitution outgoing president hu jintao's theory of scientific development. all in favor? anyone against? no one. no one. it's a show. important decisions like who will be lea
are talking about a consumer that's still struggling in this economic environment. unemployment has gotten better but it's still around 8%. we've got this fiscal cliff looming. yes, the holidays are around the corner so that's what many retailers are banking on. but beyond that it's been tough. we had super storm sandy hit. that put an impact on a lot of retailers from department stores to big box stores like target and walmart. really what they're saying is the consumer is still under some pressure. that paycheck cycle still an issue for the walmart consumer and they say that jobs, gas prices and rising food prices also an issue for that group of shoppers. >> is housing about to fall off the fiscal cliff? what homeowners and future home buyers need to know right now. >>> mean. time, let's head out to sue at the schwab investor summit. impact in chicago. what do you got, sue? >> we got a lot coming. up. incidentally, ty, they miss you out here. we're going to talk about how to prevent your portfolio from literally going over the fiscal cliff. michael cuggino will show us. a five-star rated
: well, me... me personally, i say, "get your education." >> kleinfeld: the environment is changing all the time. and if you don't stay on top of things, you know, somebody will eat your lunch. >> pitts: despite its efforts to retrain and recruit, alcoa has 27 job openings at its michigan plant alone. who do you blame for the skills gap in this country? >> kleinfeld: i don't blame anybody for that. >> pitts: who bears responsibility for you? >> kleinfeld: i think it's more an educational aspect. it's... i think it's a sensitivity to understand what makes a country and a business competitive. >> pitts: i would imagine if you had a parts gap, you'd close it right away, right? >> kleinfeld: if we had a parts gap, we'd try to close it right away, yes. >> pitts: then why can't that occur with the skills gap? >> kleinfeld: don't get from this that we're sitting together here because our... because alcoa is complaining that we can't fill the skills gap. that is absolutely not my message. we can absolutely fill that, absolutely. i mean, the... for alcoa, we can do it. we are doing it. and many
do not want to think about them as an increase. just stop the cut in an environment where it is absolutely essential. i had no children. maybe i will not feel it did not much. but like the last caller said i am ready to pay my their share. and the thing is that fairness is not guaranteed. but this is where i put my emphasis, what is democracy? we have got to try to work and create fairness. a graduated income tax is the best way to pay according to the ability to pay. the more you give, the more you pay. what is complicated? guest: the caller brings up a great point. this idea of tax fairness. who should pay more? another caller brought up before. what this caller is scion is that something that the president echoed again and again on the campaign trail. and he feels like this as part of the government moving forward. part of the tax fairness issue is at the wealthy should pay more to help pay down the deficit. the other caller was saying he feels like more people should pay federal income taxes to pay down the federal it deficit. this is sort of the two ways that the part
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
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. and talking about the public. that is not an environment in which she wheeled to say, let's go put a plan of a table. he put a plan to the table in both size and rejected. i will pause now. i actually do. >> we are already way over time. that would give one last quick question. >> thank you very much. i am with the law's vagueness council. my question is, if the demonstration decides that military action is only the -- the only exercisable options, have the other allies signaled or committed that there would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there have been those kinds of discussions because the focus is ben on diplomacy on everybody's part. by the way, it's an israeli concept. the israelis believe you can still achieve this through non-military means. one of the reasons i oftentimes did ask the question, wireless so vocal about this? if you look at what they did, the syrian one. you never heard word one about that. there's three reasons. it was designed to motivate the rest of the world. i think, by the way, we know fro
's not an environment in which you can say, gee, put a plan on the table and have it be sented. put a plan on the table, both sides reject it. if you put a plan on the table, the idea it's only table, it might be something that could work in a certain moment, but if they are rejected, it's hard then to somehow recreate it so i will pause now. i actually do have a 14-point proposal which will shock you. [laughter] i actually do. >> we are already -- >> i'm willing to leave it. >> you were patient. wuch last quick question and quick answer. >> thank you very much. i'm with the las vegas council. if the administration decides that military action is our only exercisable option, have other allies signaled or committed they would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who, and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there's been those kinds of discussions because the focus has been on diplomacy on everybody's part. the concept of crippling sanctions is an israeli concept telling you the first instance the israelis believe you can achieve this in notary public--- non-military means. i'm asked
the environment for investment. .. that is vanishing. i know people who believe it is very important energy and should not be and it is not, in this case, a political issue. in europe and in america, they're going to make this outlandish opacity. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is corruption. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold their governments to account. that is one the best things you can do to stimulate business and investments. thank you. [applause] >> hello, this issue is really close to my heart. how do we develop a global citizen's perspective and incentivize people to prioritize life outside of the u.s.? >> this sounds good. >> there is an amazing website. they just put on a concert in central park and they played. we have neil young, the black keys, a lot of people think, what? they are really pushing this idea. it is a jump in human consciousness. and i think that going to that website, i recommend it. >> good evening, i am vivien. i want to thank you for speaking candidly about africa. i am excited to sure about my con
, and therefore leveraging it to create the environment for investment. the corruption piece is amazing. let me tell you -- but in the dodd-frank bill, there can an amendment called cardin-lugar and it makes it law that any extractive industry, mining, oil, gas, registered on the new york stock exchange, it is law that they have to publish what they paid for those mining rights. it sounds obvious, doesn't it? the truth is that right now, the american petroleum institute is suing the s.e.c. to try and overthrow that. that is astonishing. i know people and oil companies who are amazing people, and it is very important to energy here. and shouldn't be and is not, in this case, a political issue. europe and america are going to make this outlandish opacity, and if that word doesn't exist i'd like to suggest it to the committee of the oxford dictionary. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is north of the equator. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold the government to account. that is one of the best things you can do to stimulate business invest
sway? guest: i think it does. he won as an independent. host: environment, public works are among the committee's senators sanders sits on. he was the mayor of burlington. gloria from texas. caller: good morning. can used to that chart that you showed earlier about what they would be paying in taxes? host: we will get the ready for you. did it concern you? caller: everybody is talking out devastating it will be to go over the cliff. people making under $20,000, $7.50 a week. there is only $270 a week. i didn't think the country will be devastated if those tax rates become effective. president obama did get a mandate to implement the taxes. he won over 2.9% of the popular vote. that is a greater percentage, not counting bush, who did not win the popular vote. host: this comes from the tax policy center and shows with the tax increases could be. guest: that is a significant tax increase and we have to avoid it. the president has urged and i support -- let's vote today on making sure that the bottom 98% of taxpayers in this country, people up to $250,000, we will make sure they will
to the attacks? what was our assessment, our united states assessment, of the environment and the conditions on the ground and had we in advance positioned the right resources to mitigate risk and to make sure that we could handle those known possibilities? >> all right. general marks, thank you very much. appreciate it. i want to go back to the attacks on israel and gaza. the u.n. security council now holding an emergency closed door session about the crisis. member nations called for this. maximum restraints so the situation does not deteriorate any further. the big fear is that the escalating violence could echo the 2008 war that led to israel's land invasion of gaza. the year-long war killed some 1,400 palestinians and israeli. fred joining us from jerusalem. fred, first of all, we saw the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu speaking earlier about the escalating violence, the tension here. here's what he said. >> no government would tolerate a situation where nearly one-fifth of its people live under a constant barrage of rockets and missile fire, and israel will not tolerate this
there was a lot that changed tuesday. that environment is somewhat reflected in the statement that speaker boehner made yesterday afternoon. i was told about comments he made on a conference call about how they had to change the way they operate. you had a very significant victory by the president who campaigned on the issue of fiscal responsibility. is there going to be a change in tax rates? , 60% favored that nationwide. most wanted it on people over $250,000 a year. they wanted 25 of 30 open senate seats. i think they are coming back with a lot of wind in their sails, like the last session of congress or the resurgent republican majority came back with something of a mandate. it is hard for them to argue that there is much of that mandate. they lost seven seats. i think they had a jury mandate but not a mandate. they did well. they perhaps maintain their majority because of the way they were able to draw districts last time. virginia went three points for the president. a very careful effort to draw those lines. it is hard to claim to have the public behind you because you have drawn the line
of the committee of which i'm a member, environment and public works, and we observed that the proposal was to give bureaucrats, government officials, unelected, the power to meet with special interests or whoever they chose to meet with or not meet with and set the amount of fees, taxes perhaps you might call it, that would be required of americans before they could hunt ducks. that's never been so. previously the congress set how much you could charge for a duck stamp. and so this was raised in committee and our able chairman, chairwoman, senator barbara boxer, agreed and i guess by a voice vote it was accepted that there will be a limit on how much -- that the congress would set the limit on how much you could raise a duck stamp. and burden duck hunters with. and that's an important principle, in my opinion. that's violated by the bill that was brought up. not the one that passed committee, but the one brought up by the leader. so i have got to say, you know, i grew up in the country. i hunted. i don't hunt anymore. i go back home and love to be in the woods, but i just don't hunt anymore. but i
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)